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Posts Tagged ‘Derrida’

The author is interested in re-examining Derrida’s legacy and its role in critical philosophy and the contemporary moment of modernity in a way that does away with what he sees as the generally limited potential of recent French thought.

What’s at stake for him is the understanding that “at the precise moment when sovereignty is being over-determined by economic, military and political hegemony” (Beardsworth 59), Derrida’s notion of democracy to come seems to perform as more a negotiation of the impossible than a recreation of what is possible. (more…)

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In his essay Derrida and the Promise of Community Lawrence Burns describes Derrida’s early work on the speech act in relationship to his later work on the function of the promise. Burns places this writing within a system of ethics and points out that Derrida’s deconstruction of the promise of writing is that it will inevitably be placed and approached in different contexts, thus opening its answerablity to an incalculable community of readers. Burns, however, takes issue with Derrida’s emphasis on the expansion of this community to come, by drawing from the writing of Paul Ricoeur, who’s philosophy of ethics sees the promise as existing within the “pragmatic context of face to face dialogue.” (more…)

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Personally, I enjoyed this essay quite a bit. Obviously, anyone who is considering a final paper on Specters would find this essay helpful for their research. However, less obviously, it would be of interest to anyone who wants to know more about the thinkers that influence Derrida’s work (or, more precisely, the thinkers that Derrida shares a parasitic relationship with!). To the latter end, it is easy to digest because the essay focuses on the single motif of the promise rather than a broad account of Derrida’s interactions with other major works/thinkers. This is only my impression, but, for those who are interested, I think Lawlor’s attention to Levinas throughout the essay is quite effective (although my summary that here is a little hasty).

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Read the interview here…

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