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Archive for the ‘Specters of Marx’ Category

Saul Newman’s essay “Anarchism, Poststructuralism and the Future of Radical Politics” discusses, as one might expect, the possibilities for radical politics after such politics are subjected to the critiques of poststructuralism. Newman comes out in favor of a “post-anarchism” that embraces the core values of classical anarchism while incorporating the post-structuralist critiques. If one can see past the barrage of “post-s” (postanarchism, post-Marxism, poststructuralism, postindustrial, post-politics – when will we ever reach post-postism?), this could prove as a fruitful source for anyone interested in the actual political implications of poststructuralist thought. (more…)

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Julie Candler Hayes’s Unconditional Translation: Derrida’s Enlightenment-to-Come focuses on the role of lumieres (enlightenment) in Derrida’s “metapolitical” thought. The a-venir (to-come) quality of Derrida’s democracy is, in his later work, extended to his concept of Enlightenment. The aporetic structure (or stricture) of lumieres and democracy is then applied to the practice of translation. (more…)

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This article can be separated into two parts, the masculine argument about Europe and the components that define European, within the context of the last European, and the feminine argument about globalization and the new international. This doesn’t suppose one is superior or inferior, but it is an essentialist claim on my part of the structural composition that is an extension of this binary. “The Other Heading” and Specters of Marx are the two primary works discussed in this article, connecting several derridian concepts raised throughout the semester. Critiques of Derrida’s reading of Marx, and of the ten plagues of the New International function within this discussion of spectrality eventually introducing the idea of the technological specter. (more…)

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Hull begins his essay with Marx’s ‘Jewish Question’ in order to speak about nationalism. Hull asserts that Marx is not the first to speak of nationalism. Benedict Anderson finds evidence of what is called the ‘nation’ in the middle ages. Marx believes that to formulate a question properly is to answer it, which is to say that to answer a question is to disperse it into other questions. Thus, when the nationalism question is answered, the question turns on a responsibility to the ghosts of non-present or partially present cultures. Not only is an inheritance, as Derrida would say, among the voices of Marx, but to betray that voice, as Marx does, explains his failure to adequately formulate the nationalist question. (more…)

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Personally, I enjoyed this essay quite a bit. Obviously, anyone who is considering a final paper on Specters would find this essay helpful for their research. However, less obviously, it would be of interest to anyone who wants to know more about the thinkers that influence Derrida’s work (or, more precisely, the thinkers that Derrida shares a parasitic relationship with!). To the latter end, it is easy to digest because the essay focuses on the single motif of the promise rather than a broad account of Derrida’s interactions with other major works/thinkers. This is only my impression, but, for those who are interested, I think Lawlor’s attention to Levinas throughout the essay is quite effective (although my summary that here is a little hasty).

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Ghostly Demarcations from Verso Books


I think this is slated to be printed in January 2008. From what I can gather it’s basically a collection of other thinkers thoughts on Specters of Marx, among them: Fredric Jameson, Antonio Negri, Terry Eagleton, and Pierre Macherey. It will also include Derrida’s reply to critics of the relationship between Deconstruction and Marxism.

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When reading Spectres of Marx and coming across the phrase “the time is out of joint” again and again, I recalled the explorations of Foucault in Society Must Be Defended. (more…)

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