Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘law’ Category

The author is interested in re-examining Derrida’s legacy and its role in critical philosophy and the contemporary moment of modernity in a way that does away with what he sees as the generally limited potential of recent French thought.

What’s at stake for him is the understanding that “at the precise moment when sovereignty is being over-determined by economic, military and political hegemony” (Beardsworth 59), Derrida’s notion of democracy to come seems to perform as more a negotiation of the impossible than a recreation of what is possible. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Saul Newman’s essay “Anarchism, Poststructuralism and the Future of Radical Politics” discusses, as one might expect, the possibilities for radical politics after such politics are subjected to the critiques of poststructuralism. Newman comes out in favor of a “post-anarchism” that embraces the core values of classical anarchism while incorporating the post-structuralist critiques. If one can see past the barrage of “post-s” (postanarchism, post-Marxism, poststructuralism, postindustrial, post-politics – when will we ever reach post-postism?), this could prove as a fruitful source for anyone interested in the actual political implications of poststructuralist thought. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Central to Puspa Damai’s article on the Messianic-City is the concept of hospitality. It is inextricable from the Derridian concept of a “city of refuge” and what Derrida sees as the intent of a city. Ruin, the threat of ruin and asylum are all discussed as tenets of the “city to come” Damai’s view of what Derrida’s city of refuge would look like focuses largely on its ipseity and ability to offer unconditional welcome to “unconditional visitors” or asylum seekers. Damai argues that Derrida’s city is at once “more than one… and less than one”(70). (more…)

Read Full Post »

Leonard Lawlor’s “From the Trace to the Law: Derridean Politics,” aims to situate Derrida’s later political engagements in terms of his earlier work on language, namely how Derrida’s work in political theory is informed by his critique of metaphysics. By focusing on Derrida’s insistence on the irreducible metaphoricity of language, as well as his concepts of the trace and iterability, Lawlor provides such a background. It is the practice of deconstruction, says Lawlor, that aims to free this irreducible metaphoricity of language that has been trapped by metaphysics within the “identity of concepts.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

When reading Spectres of Marx and coming across the phrase “the time is out of joint” again and again, I recalled the explorations of Foucault in Society Must Be Defended. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Tasing a Bro

You’ve surely seen it, but it is worth seeing with the conceptual tools of this course (thus far). And maybe asking some disconcerting questions about the inability of justice to speak itself in a way that mobilizes, rather than unnerves. Of course I’m talking about the UFlorida student who was handcuffed and tasered by security at a John Kerry event. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Take a few minutes to listen to and watch this short exchange with Derrida on love. Aside from the rather comical beginning (the interviewer’s French slurs amour to it sounds like mort – love sounds like death!), as well as Derrida’s strangely unsuccessful attempt to get a specific question, Derrida’s thoughts are really interesting. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »