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Archive for the ‘Kant’ Category

Discourse within modern day liberal democracies is increasingly imbued with rhetoric and discussion concerning rights. While the incentive for the acquisition of certain rights may be understood or interpreted in various ways from differing perspectives across the political spectrum, as demonstrated by Samuel A. Chambers in the early pages of his essay, “Ghostly Rights”, a fundamental quality influencing the nature of rights is ultimately excluded from the rights dialogue: the spectralquality of rights themselves. However, as Chambers illustrates, rights dialogues are indeed inextricably linked to a ghostly presence, to a hauntology which renders rights themselves as unreal. (more…)

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The author is interested in re-examining Derrida’s legacy and its role in critical philosophy and the contemporary moment of modernity in a way that does away with what he sees as the generally limited potential of recent French thought.

What’s at stake for him is the understanding that “at the precise moment when sovereignty is being over-determined by economic, military and political hegemony” (Beardsworth 59), Derrida’s notion of democracy to come seems to perform as more a negotiation of the impossible than a recreation of what is possible. (more…)

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Julie Candler Hayes’s Unconditional Translation: Derrida’s Enlightenment-to-Come focuses on the role of lumieres (enlightenment) in Derrida’s “metapolitical” thought. The a-venir (to-come) quality of Derrida’s democracy is, in his later work, extended to his concept of Enlightenment. The aporetic structure (or stricture) of lumieres and democracy is then applied to the practice of translation. (more…)

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So on class Wednesday I tried to raise the point that Derrida is subject to his own criticism. I would like to develop that point in this post. First I will go over my argument in terms of the discussion in class, and then I will try to ground it more in the text (which I freely admit I did not do well in class). Finally, I will synthesize the two readings. (more…)

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Summary post by Anderson Mackenzie : This essay is a chapter taken from Critchley’s book, The Ethics of Deconstruction. The major project for the book as a whole is to illustrate Critchley’s contention that deconstruction, as a method of reading philosophy, necessarily involves an ethical demand. In an earlier chapter of the book Critchley makes clear that the notion of ethics which the deconstructive method correlates to is not that of philosophical tradition but rather that of Levinas. “Clotural Readings II” is the fourth chapter in the book; it engages Levinas’s readings of Derrida’s work in order to follow Levinas as he attempts to discern and describe the ethical position of the deconstructive method. (more…)

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