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Archive for the ‘justice’ Category

This article is useful for any of you seeking to bring dimensions of gender into Derrida’s discussions of political community, specifically the impasse between universality and singularity, and the undecidability of justice. For Diane Perpich, critical engagement with the notion of sexual difference in relation to political desire opens up possibilities to move beyond (if not fully overcome) the conceptual impossibility of justice, and to resolve the impasse between universality and singularity in relation to political belonging. Despite the author’s intentions, I personally felt the article served as a compelling illustration of the difficulty of getting beyond these aporias. However, it is smart and incisive, and worth reading for anyone interested in engaging these questions. (more…)

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Central to Puspa Damai’s article on the Messianic-City is the concept of hospitality. It is inextricable from the Derridian concept of a “city of refuge” and what Derrida sees as the intent of a city. Ruin, the threat of ruin and asylum are all discussed as tenets of the “city to come” Damai’s view of what Derrida’s city of refuge would look like focuses largely on its ipseity and ability to offer unconditional welcome to “unconditional visitors” or asylum seekers. Damai argues that Derrida’s city is at once “more than one… and less than one”(70). (more…)

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This article can be separated into two parts, the masculine argument about Europe and the components that define European, within the context of the last European, and the feminine argument about globalization and the new international. This doesn’t suppose one is superior or inferior, but it is an essentialist claim on my part of the structural composition that is an extension of this binary. “The Other Heading” and Specters of Marx are the two primary works discussed in this article, connecting several derridian concepts raised throughout the semester. Critiques of Derrida’s reading of Marx, and of the ten plagues of the New International function within this discussion of spectrality eventually introducing the idea of the technological specter. (more…)

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E. Jeffrey Popke advocates that poststructuralist ethics needs to be taken more seriously in human geography. He believes that poststructuralist theory “offers the potential to break down existing categories of power and knowledge, and thereby to foster alternative narratives, which have the potential to widen the scope and scale of our geographical imaginations.” (298) In the recent explosion of moral considerations among human geographical writings, he believes that there has been a lack of engagement with poststructuralism, at least in part because it is associated with “relativism, or nihilism, which would render ethical accounts impossible.” (299) His essay, then, has the theses. First, and most explicitly, to articulate a theory of poststructuralist ethics that “suggests alternative understandings of spatiality with implications for the practice and performance of human geography.” (ibid.) Second and third, more implicitly, to adequately demonstrate why poststructuralist ethics is not relativistic or nihilistic and to prove why poststructuralist ethics successfully critique traditionalist conceptions of ethics. (The latter two points deserve to be stated formally, because Popke really intends to do more than simply show an alternative vision of spatiality. Instead, he means to use that alternative to ethically criticize the traditional notion of spatiality.) (more…)

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Leonard Lawlor’s “From the Trace to the Law: Derridean Politics,” aims to situate Derrida’s later political engagements in terms of his earlier work on language, namely how Derrida’s work in political theory is informed by his critique of metaphysics. By focusing on Derrida’s insistence on the irreducible metaphoricity of language, as well as his concepts of the trace and iterability, Lawlor provides such a background. It is the practice of deconstruction, says Lawlor, that aims to free this irreducible metaphoricity of language that has been trapped by metaphysics within the “identity of concepts.” (more…)

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Although Derrida devotes a great deal of attention to an urgent period of undecidability that precedes any decision and the coinciding sense of betrayal that follows such a decision he only hints at what characterizes the subjectivity of the decider(s). (more…)

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So on class Wednesday I tried to raise the point that Derrida is subject to his own criticism. I would like to develop that point in this post. First I will go over my argument in terms of the discussion in class, and then I will try to ground it more in the text (which I freely admit I did not do well in class). Finally, I will synthesize the two readings. (more…)

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