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Archive for the ‘aporia’ Category

The author is interested in re-examining Derrida’s legacy and its role in critical philosophy and the contemporary moment of modernity in a way that does away with what he sees as the generally limited potential of recent French thought.

What’s at stake for him is the understanding that “at the precise moment when sovereignty is being over-determined by economic, military and political hegemony” (Beardsworth 59), Derrida’s notion of democracy to come seems to perform as more a negotiation of the impossible than a recreation of what is possible. (more…)

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Julie Candler Hayes’s Unconditional Translation: Derrida’s Enlightenment-to-Come focuses on the role of lumieres (enlightenment) in Derrida’s “metapolitical” thought. The a-venir (to-come) quality of Derrida’s democracy is, in his later work, extended to his concept of Enlightenment. The aporetic structure (or stricture) of lumieres and democracy is then applied to the practice of translation. (more…)

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“Politics exists because those who have no right to be counted as speaking beings makes themselves of some account, setting up a community by placing in common a wrong that is nothing more than this very confrontation, the contradiction of two worlds in a single world: the world where they are and the world where they are not, the world where there is something ‘between’ and those who do not acknowledge them as speaking beings who count and the world where there is nothing…(this quote stuck out for me for the past two weeks in our class discussions….why politics? (more…)

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So on class Wednesday I tried to raise the point that Derrida is subject to his own criticism. I would like to develop that point in this post. First I will go over my argument in terms of the discussion in class, and then I will try to ground it more in the text (which I freely admit I did not do well in class). Finally, I will synthesize the two readings. (more…)

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I wanted to write this quick note about Wednesday’s class discussion.

Central to our concerns, of course, is the relation between law and justice in Derrida’s “Force of Law” essay. The claim is that law is founded in an act of violence and rests on a mystical foundation, which is a way of indicating the fiat character of the law. (more…)

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